Unveiling the Possibilities (Part 2)

After marking all 1200cm of veil tape, the pleats were made by placing a running stitch at each marker. Once the pleats were drawn up, the veil tape was attached to the veil with a simple whip stitch. Two stiches were used to attach each pleat.

I was extremely pleased that after all of the measuring and pleating, there was only about 5cm left of unused ruffle. The calculations turned out to be quite accurate. This veil drapes and moves differently than the first frilled veil that I made.

It has been an experience to learn to pin and display it in ways that I had not previously tried. I feel a special bond with this project, as it was my first well-researched creation.

And now for the next frilled veil… ūüėČ

~ Cristiana

 

 

Unveiling the Possibilities (Part 1)

For several years now, I have been¬†studying the frilled, ruffled, pleated, and crimped veils of the 14th century.¬† In the fall of 2009, I made my first attempt – a veil which I have loved and worn and worn.¬† However, it was definitely a beginner’s attempt.

After examining dozens and dozens of images and reading every frilled veil article that I could get my hands on, I decided to make a second frilled veil in the fall of 2010.

This time, I decided to have the ruffle surround the entire veil perimeter, which was 235cm.  The next decision was about the style of the ruffle.  For this project, I made the decision to use a cartridge pleating technique.  As such, I experimented with 3 different pleating sizes: 0.5cm, 1.0cm, and 1.5cm.  After trying all 3 sizes, it was easy to choose 1.0cm as the best size for both width and spacing.

The next problem was to figure out the best method to mark for the pleats.  I decided to use pins instead of a modern marking pen as a possible method more authentic to the middle ages.  With 1cm pleats, 1,200cm of veil tape was needed Рwith 1,200 marking pins.

~Cristiana